Tip-Jarred: How to save money without breaking sweat

From consolidation to cutting expenses, everyone is trying to save money.

Saving money is unique in a lot of ways, mostly because everyone wants to do it, few are good at it, and there really isn’t any way to get around the fact that having it is going to make your financial future brighter and, in turn, easier to manage.

And that goes for simple, day-to-day expenses or the much anticipated retirement.

Simply put, everything revolves around saving money.

And with good reason: you have to budget your money, make sure you’re spending less then you make (a fact lost on most of us) and that your planning of how, when and why your money is being put into play is constantly questioned and can change on a whim based on your financial need.

But why do you tend to make saving money so hard? Is it because we want things we can’t afford or don’t need (vacation, abundance of clothes, second homes, etc.) and we decide that we’d rather have them and borrow money we don’t have to ensure that these things are taking over and our financial goals of saving and securing retirement funds fall by the wayside?

The truth is we make money, saving it, more difficult then it needs. The truth of the matter is your budget and how you look at money needs to start with a stripped down budget and a not being afraid to cut as needed.

You can save money by doing one of the two things: cutting expenses or increasing income. Both can be done without much heartburn if you know where to look. The two biggest money pitfalls are food and unused goods or services. The food one is easy, as many eat out at restaurants for lunch or dinner on a weekly basis, yet we can still spend hundreds of dollars a week at the grocery store. Seems like we’re double dipping on that line item. Taking the time to meal prep and pack lunches is going to save you thousands each year.

As for the unused items, look around your house or consider the services you employ and never use. Gym and tanning spa memberships come to mind immediately, as well as things such as cell phones and cable television. Your phone and cable (with internet) is likely costing you upwards of $300 per month, when a Netflix account and a phone on a lesser, yet reliable network (Sprint, T Mobile, Boost, etc.) is all you’ll need to cut that previous bill in half.

Saving isn’t about working your fingers to the bone at five jobs but more about knowing your financial limitations and not being afraid to save when you least expected it.