Food for Thought: How to save money at restaurants

If you had to pick one spot, one location or one place of business or service you spend most of your extra income, what would you choose?
The shoppers of the world might select malls, department stores and other places that do an outstanding job marketing their clothing to you as if you can’t live without it. Others might opt for most of their disposable income finding its way right to your stomach.

And by that, you’re talking about the propensity to spend money eating out at restaurants, something that can account for thousands of dollars in money spent that you wish you could have back the moment that last bite or sip is taken.

The truth is most financial experts and advocates will tell you that you should eating out at all costs, and the numbers certainly suggest that. If you eat dinner out, just yourself, three times per week and the average check is $20, you’re likely to spend nearly $3,000 per year just on restaurant dining. When you add that to your grocery bill, you are essentially paying for food twice: the food in your fridge and the food you’re ordering in or taking out, for starters.

Now as much as you want to say so long to restaurant or fast food dining for good, that isn’t realistic, and those same experts that tell you to give eating out the boot are the ones that also will suggest that budgeting should be realistic.

So, now what?

You might want to think about limiting the amount of time you spend eating out at restaurants, but if you must eat out for lunch or dinner, then you certainly can do so with saving money in mind. There are plenty of ways to save money on food in restaurants, starting with promotional sites and other online forums that give you a special two for $20 or some other dining experience where the pricing is cut in half.

Even better is skipping the expensive drink or dessert, and instead focusing the meal itself. And, as much as you’re in the restaurant because you’re hungry, you’re also inclined to visit that spot for socialization as well. So if you’re just tagging along after work or with a group of friends, you might want to consider eating before you go. That way, you’re inclined to get a drink, small appetizer rather than break the bank on the dinner menu.

Eating out is convenient, but doesn’t have to be completely off limits due to its cost. It can be done without spending a small fortune if you’re making it part of your budget or doing so with frugality in mind.