Road Closed: Are you headed for financial disaster?

Money is always a unique element of your daily life in that you often fall into a comfort level, assuming that all is well when in actuality you’re headed in the wrong direction. In some cases, you’re teetering on the brink of breaking the bank wide open, and not in a good way.

That “comfort level” includes paying the minimum payment on all your credit accounts, yet still charging to the that same card, or continuing to live paycheck to paycheck and not being able to save money. Those are just a few of the pratfalls that could easily continue and thus lead you to financial ruin in a short amount of time.

The minimum payment, still opening up new lines of credit or charging to the same cards is a huge red flag when it comes to your finances being porous. If you’re paying $150 on a credit card and charging another $100, you’re ahead $50 but once you track the interest at about 10 to 15 percent, you’re breaking even ever month. That lineage hardly works toward lowering your debt and being able to save money in the process. Furthermore, some still open up more lines of credit and debt, even though they aren’t putting a dent in any other loans they have. You’re debt to income ratio starts to go from the wanted 70 to 30 ratio to more like 50 to 50, which is going to make getting a loan for the important things (home improvement, schooling, medical expenses, etc.) even more difficult.

You also can’t overlook not being able to pay your bills on time and being harassed by companies with past due notices and other warnings of that ilk, and you simply don’t do anything to stop the calls and just ignore the problem, hoping it will go away.

In actuality, taking on credit and debt head on is your best course of action, simply because a lot of debt collectors and companies will work with you on a settlement that will allow you to pay potentially half of that debt off just to settle it.

One of the worst parts of your finances and almost as bad as making minimum payments and yet still charging is borrowing money from the people you know, whether that’s your parents, cousins, aunts and uncles or just about anyone else you can think of that is considered family. Co workers often could even get in the mix, and doing this not only strains relationships but also could potentially lead to a complete dilution altogether, where you don’t speak to the party that loaned you the money.

Managing your finances the right way takes two things: eyes wide open and being able to realize when things are getting really bad.