Spend Undone: Bad spending hurts your debt situation

Do you know how to spend correctly?

Now, the definition of “correctly” is what get most of us in trouble when you’re talking about debt as some might deem that sports car a correct way of spending, while others think of more astute and more intelligent ways to spend their money, such as that pesky 401K contribution or setting aside five to 10 percent of every paycheck into their savings account.

Bad spending can be identified as what not to do with your money or habits that are going to lead to a lack of money saved or a financial standing filled with debt, among other money faux pas that could be in your not so distant future.

The first rule of thumb when it comes to spending is to actually know what you’re able to spend, and that starts with a budget you actually follow. Otherwise, you’ll be making the one mistake that the majority of people with a plethora of debt do: spend more than you actually make. That means quite simply if you spend $2,000 per month and make $1,700, you’re operating at a deficiency.

As obvious as that should seem, a good portion of the population resides with more than $20,000 in debt on average (per household). The reason most spend this way is because they live beyond their means, and budgeting is something that sounds good in theory, like when someone knows that their car payment is due “around” a certain date, but actually isn’t being practiced the way it should.

Bad spending could also be considered the kind of spending that is done with money that isn’t really even yours. That’s not to suggest theft by any means, but more along the lines of spending money on vacation and charging it on a credit card. Or using that same plastic to charge your way to a new work wardrobe or, even worse, using credit to pay your bills, a sign that again, budgeting isn’t your strong suit.

Debt is meant to be paid in an orderly fashion, so borrowing more to pay off debt is spending that is a totally neutral or lateral move. Now, if you want to lower an interest rate or consolidate so that you only have to pay one payment, so be it. But if you’re paying credit card debt with opening another credit card of the same ilk, you’re not going to get ahead any time soon.

So what exactly is “correct” spending? The kind of spending that allows you to have what you need and put the wants on hold or at least prioritized when you actually have the money.

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